Category: Leadership

Physicians and clinicians assuming more leadership roles

By George Williams, MD, MMM, FACEP
President, MedHealth

A few years ago, the American College of Physician Executives (ACPE) published a white paper, “The Value of Physician Leadership.” Using literature reviews and interviews with healthcare professionals, the document draws a clear connection between physician leadership and high performing healthcare organizations. The white paper is summarized in a FierceHealthcare article published on May 6, 2014, ACPE: Physician leadership linked to organizational success.” Around the same time, ACPE elected to change the organization’s name to the American Association for Physician Leadership based on the realization that leadership more appropriately encapsulates the work that administrative physicians are performing in healthcare organizations.

GeorgeWilliamsReading the article, I found it validating to discover that what we have been pursuing at Methodist Health System, bringing more clinicians into senior leadership roles, is being practiced across the country by healthcare organizations large and small. Currently, Methodist has three clinicians heading different organizations. Martin L. Koonsman, MD, FACS, is president of Methodist Dallas Medical Center. Fran Laukaitis, MHA, BSN, FACHE, is president of Methodist Charlton Medical Center. I am president of MedHealth, an organization of 30 Methodist Family Health Centers and 14 specialty practices located throughout the greater Dallas area. In addition, Sam Cullison, MD, serves as vice president of the graduate medical education program; Brian Kenjarski, MD, MBA, FACEP, is chief medical information officer; and Melissa Gerdes, MD, FAAFP, is vice president and chief medical officer, outpatient services and ACO strategy.

We are proof of Methodist’s belief that clinicians can be very effective leaders. In truth, we view ourselves as healthcare leaders who happen to be physicians or nurses. I believe that Methodist’s investment in the training and nurturing of clinicians to become leaders is one reason we are consistently rated among the best places to work.

The ACPE white paper states, “… physicians, with their deep clinical understanding and desire to provide the best care for patients, are well-placed to help bring about the redesign of care that is the bedrock of health reform.”

Methodist, like most healthcare organizations, is facing a variety of challenges including rising rates of chronic diseases, clinician shortages, and an aging population. If we want to retain high-quality physicians, it’s necessary to have physician leaders capable of empathizing with colleagues who are being expected to embrace a barrage of clinical practice changes to address these challenges. Today’s healthcare environment requires practicing collaboratively, completely contrary to the way that medicine has been practiced historically. Motivating physicians to make this leap of faith requires strong, insightful physician leaders who can educate and persuade their peers.

Which skills do physicians need to reach their full leadership potential? According to the ACPE white paper, here are the five key competencies for physician-leadership success:

  • Knowledge of the healthcare environment
  • Professionalism
  • Communication and relationship management
  • Business skills and knowledge
  • Leadership and ability to inspire

In order to develop physician leaders, Methodist created the Physician Leadership Institute. Participants complete a two-year didactic curriculum sponsored by the American Association for Physician Leadership. Additionally, each physician commits to completing a quality improvement project as part of the program.

Thanks to the Institute, we’re making progress in placing more clinicians in key leadership roles. While the challenges and expectations for physicians continue to intensify, the need for leaders who understand physician dynamics and who are keenly aware of the requirements that will be necessary to lead healthcare systems is greater than ever. I expect to see more and more large healthcare systems including physician leaders on their senior teams. I’m proud to say that Methodist has been on the leading edge of this trend.

If you’re looking for an opportunity to work in an organization that values clinical leadership, then consider Methodist Health System. Visit us at Jobs.MethodistHealthSytem.org.

© Methodist Health System
EOE/MF/D/V

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Advancing from Nursing to the President’s Chair: Anything is Possible

By Fran Laukaitis, MHA, BSN, FACHE
President, Methodist Charlton Medical Center

Fran Laukaitis was recently named president of Methodist Charlton Medical Center. Fran served as Methodist Charlton’s chief nursing officer since 2010. She is the first registered nurse to ever serve as president of a Methodist Health System facility. 

I have been a nurse for 40 years, and never imagined that I would be leading a great health care organization today. Initially, I spent 15 years as a bedside nurse in the ICU. But when I had the opportunity to start taking leadership roles, I continued to moonlight in ED and ICU because I never wanted to lose site of the most important focus — caring for patients.

It may surprise you to learn that my aspiration was not to be where I am today. Instead, I was willing to serve in whatever capacity I was needed. Throughout my career, when a supervisory position was offered to me, I took it. From nursing to ancillary and support departments to plant operations, that willingness to learn was a valuable lesson. As a result, today I have experience in most of the departments within the hospital.

I think there are five characteristics that make a great health care leader:

  1. Recognize that all decisions need to be centered on what’s best for the patient, because that’s the heart of our business.
  2. Leaders must have and demonstrate integrity.
  3. A leader must always strive to be fair and bring people together. As a nurse, one might think I may favor nurses; however, I learned that the person who really needs to win is the patient. So if our decisions are based on what’s best for the patient, then it brings disparate parties together to achieve success as a team.
  4. Every great leader I’ve observed or read about has possessed a strong work ethic balanced by kindness and compassion.
  5. Finally, a leader must have an overwhelming desire to be a leader, even if it means stepping out of his or her comfort zone.

Along the way, I have been fortunate to have outstanding mentors who have given me sage advice. An example is when I chose the program for my master’s degree. I sought counsel from my mentor, and she gave me two pieces of advice that changed my career and my life. First, she recommended pursing a Master of Health Administration. She was right. Second, she encouraged me to join the American College of Healthcare Executives. Again, she was on target.

Using past experience as a guide, here are my tips for young professionals:

  1. Don’t wait to continue your education. Learning is a lifelong endeavor.
  2. Take advantage of opportunities. You’ll end up where you’re supposed to be. Don’t be afraid to take chances.
  3. Stay present. Some people are so busy getting to the next step in their careers, they fail to focus on the present. Instead, focus on where you are right now so you can do your best job today.

How is my experience as chief nursing officer now helping me in my role as president? I don’t have to rely on what others tell me about the need for medical equipment or clinical resources. As a clinician, I understand what their challenges are. The physicians also appreciate the fact that I “get it.” And when I need to lobby for scarce resources, I feel that I represent Methodist Charlton well because of the breadth of my clinical background.

One of the most fulfilling aspects of my job is that employees tell me that I “fill them up.” But when they ask who fills me up, they’re surprised to learn that it’s all of them. They inspire me daily. My goal is to show them that you can do anything if you work hard, have integrity, and do what’s right. These beliefs carry over to who I surround myself with on my leadership team. I can teach skills — finance, budgeting, managing — but I can’t teach attitude. I want to be surrounded, and I want our employees to be surrounded, by people who are positive and recognize that what we do for a living is a privilege.

I feel so blessed to have this opportunity and to do this work.

If you’re ready to pursue limitless possibilities for your career, then choose Methodist Health System. Learn more by visiting Jobs.MethodistHealthSystem.org.

© Methodist Health System

EOE/M/F/D/V

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Celebrating Our Nurses

Irene Strejc, MPH, BSN, RN, CENP, ACHE
Vice President Nursing, Chief Nursing Officer
Methodist Richardson Medical Center

One of my favorite times of year is upon us — National Nurses Week. May 6-12 has been set aside as the time for the entire country to celebrate the profession of nursing and thank nurses everywhere for their selfless dedication to others.

My desire to be a nurse started at a very young age. When I was 5 years old, I was hospitalized for flulike symptoms. Even at that young point in my life, I was impressed with the kindness and graciousness of the nurses who cared for me. Perhaps it was because I come from a long line of family members who have deep roots in health care, but I wanted to continue the tradition. When I became a teen, I volunteered at a hospital, then went on to finish a two-year associate’s degree so I could immediately begin caring for others. After working a few years, I realized the vast potential that a nursing career offered, so I went back to school and earned a Bachelor in Nursing then my Master of Public Health.

Each year, I look forward to recognizing nurses during this special week because I think it provides an opportunity to consider the characteristics and values that drive individuals to enter nursing. It also creates a public forum to officially recognize and thank all of our nurses for their selfless dedication to others and the differences they makes in patients’ lives each and every day.

Nursing is the linchpin that brings everything together. Nurses are the eyes and ears of the physicians when they can’t be at the hospital. Working together, physicians and nurses can provide timely, appropriate, patient-centered care. Physicians tell us every day how much they appreciate the spirit of partnership they share with our nurses as they work to achieve the best possible patient outcomes. Year after year, patient surveys indicate that nurses are one of the most trusted members of the health care team. In fact, patients’ attitudes toward their nurses are the most highly correlated components of the patient experience in terms of overall satisfaction. We consistently receive comments from patients thanking their nurses for keeping them informed throughout their care, teaching them about caring for themselves once they leave the hospital, and demonstrating an ability to anticipate their needs before they have to push the call light.

What is the profile of a good nurse? First, nurses have a strong altruistic need to care for people at the most vulnerable times of their lives. There’s no greater contribution you can give to others than to be with them, care for them, and support them and their families during times of personal health crises. In general, nurses are also highly intelligent, good problem solvers, caring and compassionate, dedicated to their profession and to the well-being of their patients, and willing to go above and beyond the call of duty to take care of their patients.

As I speak with nursing graduates today, two themes come through loud and clear. First, nursing is a financially rewarding career that weathers economic down turns. Second, it offers many career options — hospital, physician’s office, rehab, hospice, home health, case management, quality assurance, insurance companies, state agencies, and many other related careers.

At Methodist Richardson Medical Center this week, we are holding several celebratory events that will feature guest speakers, food, and time to socialize with fellow nurses. We’ll be doing clinical rounding throughout the hospital to support our nurses where they work. In addition, we will be presenting two awards — Nurse of the Year and Rookie Nurse of the Year — as we springboard into celebrating National Hospital Week the following week. Our celebrations are from the heart, overflowing with deep appreciation and admiration.

Truly it’s a special privilege to stand with each one of our nurses every day. Caring for our patients and their families is a team effort and each member is an all-star. Together, nurses and other members of the care team are improving clinical care and enhancing the level of service we provide to those who trust us with their overall health and well-being.

If you’re ready to celebrate your career as a nurse, consider Methodist Health System. To learn more, visit us at Jobs.MethodistHealthSystem.org.

© Methodist Health System

EOE/MF/D/V

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Seven Methodist Health System Nurses Named to Dallas-Fort Worth Great 100 2015

Do you remember the classic movie that was released in 1960, “The Magnificent Seven?” The movie focused on a small town that hired seven men to help protect its citizens. We think all of our nurses are magnificent, and especially the seven Methodist Health System nurses who have been named DFW Great 100 Nurses 2015. This award is recognized throughout the nursing community in the DFW Metroplex as an esteemed honor and prestigious accomplishment. Here are brief snapshots of each of the distinguished honorees. We are proud to call them family.

Sherri Floyd, BSN, RN, Risk Manager, Methodist Dallas Medical Center
Sherri has been a nurse at Methodist Dallas for 22 years. She spent 19 years in the surgical intensive care unit and the last three years in the risk management department.

“The most important value a Great 100 Nurse can have is passion. Nurses are compassionate by nature, but we must have that passion, that fire in the gut, to facilitate change and growth. My goal as risk manager is to assure that each bedside nurse can make a difference for all patients. I work daily with nurses and managers to increase patient safety as well as that of the employee. I have driven from Fort Worth to Methodist Dallas all of these years because Methodist is my family. I can’t imagine working at any other hospital.”

Karrie Klein, RNC-OB, Staff Nurse, Labor and Delivery, Methodist Mansfield Medical Center
Karrie has been a labor and delivery nurse at Methodist Mansfield since 2008.

“The most important value a Great 100 Nurse can have is commitment — commitment to making nursing your lifestyle, not just a 12-hour job. Sometimes, an empathetic nurse is all the family and visitors have to look forward to. Everything we do supports families and patients when they are at their most vulnerable. I think a Great 100 Nurse has an innate gift of unconditional compassion and a mission to promote quality of life. We work to positively impact not only our patients, but also our work unit by finding ways to improve patient care and satisfaction. That also means reaching beyond the hospital’s doors and into the community to provide education and promote community health.”

Cindy Lantz, RN, Nurse Manager, Observation Unit, Methodist Dallas Medical Center
Cindy has been a nurse at Methodist Dallas for 15 years.

“I feel very humbled to receive this award. I work with a great team of people. I truly love being a nurse, and I hope I am helping to make a difference for others. My philosophy is that we shouldn’t define our patients by their diagnoses. Every patient has a story, a reason that brought him or her to our doors, a life before he or she became sick or injured. I make it a point to take a few minutes to talk to each of my patients about their life, to get to know them as a person, not just a diagnosis.”

Cassie Oden, RN, CEN, Staff Nurse, Emergency Department, Methodist Dallas Medical Center
Cassie has been a nurse at Methodist Dallas for seven years.

“I am very pleased to have been selected as one of DFW’s Great 100 Nurses. I never thought I would be chosen for such an award. It is such an honor. I have always strived to give my best to every patient. In the emergency department (ED), we deal with people of all ages with a wide range of injury and illness acuity. A large part of our job is providing compassionate care to our patients and comforting their family during life-changing events. This is especially important after the death of a loved one. My advice to other nurses is to give the best care you can to every patient. Be compassionate and remember that the patient’s family needs care, too. Never stop learning or improving yourself.”

Nancy Valant, BSN, RN, CEN, Staff Nurse, Emergency Department, Methodist Dallas Medical Center
Nancy has been a nurse at Methodist Dallas for 29 years. She was a member of the first intensive care unit (ICU) internship class.

“There are several values that a Great 100 Nurse has — integrity, experience, knowledge, respect from co-workers and management, and the willingness to keep learning. After spending seven years in the ICU, I transferred to the ED for a more active environment and have been here ever since. I love the teamwork and the cohesiveness, plus we see a great variety of patient illnesses and trauma. I feel I can make a difference in the lives of my patients, and I get a sense of fulfillment and satisfaction from my job that I don’t get anywhere else.”

John Vo, MSN, RN, Director, Neurosurgery and Orthopedic Services, Methodist Dallas Medical Center
John has been with Methodist Dallas for 14 years.

“It’s such an honor to be recognized as a Great 100 Nurse. Why am I in nursing today? When I was in college, I had to be hospitalized. There, I experienced two kinds of nursing care — one nurse who was compassionate and caring and another who was not so much. That influenced my career decision to go into health care and be the kind of nurse who patients and families could really depend on. I am committed to give them the very best care possible. Today, when I talk with nurses who are considering changing jobs, I tell them to come to Methodist. ‘You won’t get lost in a big corporate structure. The culture is welcoming and friendly. And everyone is willing to help.’ I’m blessed to work with such a talented group of people.”

Judy VonEhr, RN, BSN, Manager, NICU and Neonatal Transport Team, Methodist Dallas Medical Center
Judy has been with Methodist Dallas for two years.

“I always wanted to be a nurse, so it’s no surprise I’ve had a 36-year nursing career. My passion has always been to work with children, so I eventually became a neonatal intensive care unit nurse. The greatest gratification I get from my work is taking care of a very small infant who may be really sick, then seeing that child with his or her family thriving a few years later. Seeing what a difference I can make for these babies and their families is so rewarding. Methodist is one of the greatest places I’ve ever worked. Every day I feel that I’m supported by my colleagues and by our leadership.”

The DFW Great 100 Nurses was launched in 1991 as a celebration that raises the awareness of the area’s 40,000 practicing nurses’ contributions, including patient care, research, leadership, education, and community service. In addition, the celebration builds the image of nursing through positive reinforcement of the profession as a scientific art and the recognition of those who exemplify excellence. It is a special honor for a nurse to be nominated by patients, their family members, peers, former teachers, physicians, and administrators.

If you’re ready to join a great organization that emphasizes professionalism, collaboration, and accountability to each other, consider Methodist Health System. To learn more, visit us at Jobs.MethodistHealthSystem.org.

© Methodist Health System

EOE/MF/D/V

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Three from Methodist Health System Honored in D Magazine’s Excellence in Healthcare Awards

12/8/14

Stephen L. Mansfield, PhD, FACHE, Methodist Health System president and CEO; Darin Charles, MD, family medicine physician at Methodist Family Health Center – Mansfield North; and Jeannette McCally, Methodist Mansfield Medical Center volunteer, were honored in D Magazine’s Excellence in Healthcare Awards for 2014. These representatives are among the top 18 individuals in North Texas chosen for their excellence in health care from more than 175.

Dr. Mansfield was honored as Outstanding Healthcare Executive. He is well known throughout the Metroplex for leading one of the fastest-growing health care systems in Texas. Not only has he led the hospital in clinical and financial performance, he has also shown commitment to the community he serves. Since the start of his leadership at Methodist in 2006, the health system has nearly tripled its revenue, operates eight hospitals and 27primary care centers, and serves 14,000 enrollees in its Accountable Care Organization. Dr. Mansfield was instrumental in leading the health system to pair with the renowned Mayo Clinic for collaborative care. He remains committed to Methodist’s mission of providing compassionate, quality care to every patient in a changing health care environment. Throughout his distinguished career, Dr. Mansfield has viewed his leadership role as a ministry to serve people from all walks of life.

Dr. Charles was named an Outstanding Healthcare Practitioner finalist. In addition to being a family medicine physician at Methodist Family Health Center – Mansfield North, he is the medical director for the Mansfield Independent School District Staff Clinic. He is a leader in his field of family medicine and is committed to establishing and maintaining a patient-centered model of care. His service exemplifies servant leadership. To help make a difference in the community, he was instrumental in assembling a team of physicians to conduct free sports physicals for student athletes and promotes health by participating in local walks and runs.

Mrs. McCally was named an Outstanding Healthcare Volunteer finalist. She is an ambassador for Methodist Mansfield, giving thousands of hours of volunteerism. She is a founding member of the Auxiliary and has served on the Auxiliary’s board of directors for eight consecutive years. Since 2006, she has led fundraising efforts for the annual Holly Days, Style Show, and General Store at the hospital.

“Dr. Mansfield, Dr. Charles, and Mrs. McCally are known for their leadership, expertise, and compassion for serving others,” says Levi Davis, chairman, Methodist Health System board of directors. “They are dedicated to our community and are well deserving of this honor.”

Photographs are available at www.methodisthealthsystem.org/photos-d-ceo-excellence-in-healthcare-finalists-2014

About Methodist Health System
Guided by the founding principles of life, learning, and compassion, Methodist Health System (Methodist) provides quality, integrated care to improve and save the lives of individuals and families throughout North Texas.  Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Methodist Charlton Medical Center, Methodist Mansfield Medical Center, Methodist Richardson Medical Center, Methodist Midlothian Health Center, and Methodist Family Health Centers are part of the nonprofit Methodist Health System, which is affiliated by covenant with the North Texas Conference of The United Methodist Church. Additional information is available at www.methodisthealthsystem.org. To see why Methodist Health System is a brilliant choice for your career, join our talent community at Jobs.MethodistHealthSystem.org and connect with us through Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and our blog.

Texas law prohibits hospitals from practicing medicine. The physicians on the Methodist Health System medical staff are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Methodist Health System.

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Human Resources
1441 N. Beckley Avenue
Dallas, TX 75203
Contact: Suzanne Lewis
214.352.5929
s.lewis@hscmarketing.com

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Methodist Dallas Medical Center Names David D. Clark New President

09/16/2014

David D. Clark, FACHE President of Methodist Dallas Medical Center

Methodist Health System has selected David D. Clark, FACHE, as president of Methodist Dallas Medical Center. He returned to Texas September 2 from Utah to assume his new role, and in his first two weeks, Methodist announced the Mayo Clinic collaboration and The Joint Commission arrived for the triennial survey.

Clark’s background includes a range of responsibilities with diverse health care organizations, including an academic medical center, rural hospitals, and tertiary care hospitals, as well as regional leadership roles with Christus Health, Intermountain Healthcare, and CHE Trinity Health. He holds a Bachelor of Science in finance from Brigham Young University and a Master of Business Administration in health organization management from Texas Tech University. He has been recognized as an Up and Comer by Modern Healthcare magazine, presented the Grassroots Champion award by the American Hospital Association, and named a Health Care Hero by Utah Business magazine. He was recipient of the Manager of the Year award at Intermountain Healthcare and received a Touchstone Award from Christus Health for his work on staffing productivity and best practices. In 2011, Clark’s article on “Cost Containment without Compromising Quality Care” was featured in Frontiers of Health Services Management. He serves on The Joint Commission’s Professional and Technical Advisory Committee and the American College of Healthcare Executive’s Nominations Committee.

“Passionate about faith-based health care, David has an impressive background and his values align with the Methodist Health System mission and values,” says Pam Stoyanoff, executive vice president and chief operating officer of Methodist Health System. “We are pleased he is joining the Methodist Health System family as we continue to embark on new innovative initiatives and growth strategies.”

Clark’s father was a neurosurgeon and his grandfather a general practice physician. “I was exposed to health care from an early age, and while I respected physicians, I knew I did not want to be a surgeon like my father, who covered three counties and worked 100 hours a week,” says Clark. “In college, I enjoyed studying human resources, finance, economics, and marketing. I wanted to make a difference in health care like my father and grandfather and determined faith-based hospital leadership was my calling after learning from my grandfather, who also served as a hospital president in Santa Ana, California.”

Most recently Clark and his wife, Dodie, resided in Utah. They are now empty nesters but cherish time with their four children and five grandchildren. Clark enjoys sports, traveling, reading, but, most important, family time with his wife, children, and grandchildren. “This is an exciting time for Methodist Dallas Medical Center with the recent opening of the Sammons Tower and the new collaboration with Mayo Clinic,” says Clark. “I am pleased to be joining this outstanding organization as it continues to serve North Texas with compassionate, quality health care.”

About Methodist Health System
Guided by the founding principles of life, learning, and compassion, Methodist Health System (Methodist) provides quality, integrated care to improve and save the lives of individuals and families throughout North Texas.  Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Methodist Charlton Medical Center, Methodist Mansfield Medical Center, Methodist Richardson Medical Center, Methodist Midlothian Health Center, and Methodist Family Health Centers are part of the nonprofit Methodist Health System, which is affiliated by covenant with the North Texas Conference of The United Methodist Church. Additional information is available at www.methodisthealthsystem.org. To see why Methodist Health System is a brilliant choice for your career, join our talent community at Jobs.MethodistHealthSystem.org and connect with us through Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and our blog.

About Methodist Health System Foundation
Methodist Health System is a nonprofit organization. If you are interested in supporting vital health care and community programs, please contact the Methodist Health System Foundation at 214-947-4555 or visit them online at foundation.methodisthealthsystem.org/

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Human Resources
1441 N. Beckley Avenue
Dallas, TX 75203
Contact: Suzanne Lewis
214.352.5929
s.lewis@hscmarketing.com

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Methodist Health System Becomes Newest Member of Mayo Clinic Care Network

9/9/14

Mayo Clinic and Methodist Health System (Methodist) officials announced today that Methodist has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network. Methodist, one of North Texas’ oldest nonprofit health systems, was selected following a comprehensive evaluation that ranged from its clinical and business practices to quality, safety and service efforts and patient satisfaction.

Mayo Clinic and Methodist share a common philosophy and commitment to improve the delivery of health care through high-quality, collaborative medical care.

“Methodist is home to some of the most accomplished and preeminent physicians in the Southwest,” says Stephen Mansfield, Ph.D., FACHE, president and CEO, Methodist Health System. “Working with Mayo Clinic through the Mayo Clinic Care Network will be accretive for Methodist physicians and will afford access to world class Mayo Clinic specialization for patients treated at Methodist Health System.”

The Mayo Clinic Care Network extends Mayo Clinic’s knowledge to physicians and providers interested in working together in the best interest of their patients. Methodist physicians will now be able to collaborate with Mayo Clinic on patient care, community health and innovative health care delivery. Using digital technology to consult and share knowledge, these physicians will have access to the latest evidence-based medical information and will connect with Mayo specialists on questions related to complex medical cases.

“The Mayo Clinic Care Network is about strengthening existing relationships with high-quality, like-minded health care institutions for the benefit of our patients,” says David Hayes, M.D., medical director, Mayo Clinic Care Network. “Our colleagues at Methodist are well-known for their excellent patient care in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. We are proud to welcome them to the network and look forward to continued collaboration.”

Mayo Clinic Care Network members have a close working relationship with Mayo Clinic and access to tools and services that promote collaboration and serve to complement provider expertise, including:

  • eConsults to allow network physicians to connect electronically with Mayo Clinic specialists when they want additional input regarding a patient’s care.
  • AskMayoExpert to provide point-of-care information compiled by Mayo physicians on disease management, care guidelines, treatment recommendations and reference materials for a wide variety of medical conditions.
  • eTumor Board Conferences to allow physicians to present and discuss management of complex cancer cases with a Mayo Clinic multidisciplinary panel and other members of the network.

In addition to health care provider-focused tools, Methodist will also have access to Mayo Clinic Health Care Consulting, a service that allows members to learn how Mayo operates and how its clinical care and practice are designed and implemented.

“This is a tremendous opportunity for Methodist to collaborate with Mayo Clinic to enhance patient care,” says Sam Bagchi, M.D., vice president, chief medical informatics officer and chief quality officer, Methodist Health System. “The addition of Mayo Clinic Care Network resources provides a unique opportunity to align our core values of innovation and quality so that Methodist patients gain the benefits of Mayo Clinic expertise while they continue to receive their care as close to home as possible.”

The Mayo Clinic Care Network represents nonownership relationships between Mayo Clinic and network members. The network, which began in 2011, now has 31 members that extend to 18 states, as well as Puerto Rico and Mexico.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education for people from all walks of life. For more information, please visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about/ and www.mayoclinic.org/news.

About Methodist Health System
Guided by the founding principles of life, learning, and compassion, Methodist Health System (Methodist) provides quality, integrated care to improve and save the lives of individuals and families throughout North Texas.  Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Methodist Charlton Medical Center, Methodist Mansfield Medical Center, Methodist Richardson Medical Center, Methodist Midlothian Health Center, and Methodist Family Health Centers are part of the nonprofit Methodist Health System, which is affiliated by covenant with the North Texas Conference of The United Methodist Church. Additional information is available at www.methodisthealthsystem.org. To see why Methodist Health System is a brilliant choice for your career, join our talent community at Jobs.MethodistHealthSystem.org and connect with us through Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and our blog.

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Human Resources
1441 N. Beckley Avenue
Dallas, TX 75203
Contact: Suzanne Lewis
214.352.5929
s.lewis@hscmarketing.com

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Meet the New Chief Nursing Officer at Methodist Mansfield Medical Center

By Nora Frasier, MBA, RN, FACHE, NEA-BC
Chief Nursing Officer
Methodist Mansfield Medical Center

Have you ever been so happy to be with a company at a certain time in your career that you needed to pinch yourself to make sure you weren’t dreaming? That pretty much sums up how I feel about my new role as chief nursing officer at Methodist Mansfield Medical Center.

Being the new kid on the block at a wonderful hospital is always exciting. And joining the leadership team just in time to celebrate the groundbreaking for the new 118-bed patient care tower is icing on the cake. I can’t think of a better time to be a nurse, especially at Methodist Mansfield.

What do I have to offer? With more than 20 years in nursing leadership, I have been enriched by experiences in several institutions of varying sizes and types (nonprofit and for-profit, 98 beds to 1,100 beds, academic and community-based). I am privileged to serve as an appraiser team leader for the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Magnet Recognition Program®, the most prestigious distinction a health care organization can receive for nursing excellence and quality patient outcomes. My role with the Magnet Recognition Program enables me to experience the cultures of many wonderful hospitals during on-site surveys to assess their compliance with program standards and readiness for Magnet designation. Every time I walk into a hospital that clearly values excellence in nursing, it’s tremendously reenergizing. The direction that Magnet is moving today places more emphasis on outcomes, paving the way for hospitals to thrive in the future. And today, almost 50 percent of the Magnet standards are focused on outcomes. That’s a positive change for hospitals.

There were many reasons I chose to join the Methodist Mansfield family. It was exciting to be part of a growing organization, one that has been voted a Best Place to Work by the Dallas Business Journal for 10 years in a row. And it was thrilling to join a hospital that had begun the Journey to Magnet Excellence® status where we can integrate best practices from other Magnet hospitals into our nursing model at Methodist Mansfield.

Even though it’s only been a few months since joining Methodist Mansfield, I’m already filled with the pride and dedication that permeates the entire community. Here, we take our community tagline, “We Are Mansfield” seriously. Everyone understands that Mansfield is a special place to live and work. The entire Methodist Mansfield family realizes and appreciates the trust and dependence that the community places in us to care for their health and well-being. I’m also struck with how quality is a driving force throughout the entire Methodist Health System. We expect nothing less than the best clinical outcomes for our patients and that guides all of our efforts and energy.

What is my philosophy of care? The mantra I espouse is adapted from learnings from a study that found that patients want three things, which we work to deliver every day as caregivers in the hospital:

  1. First, they want to be safe. We’re focused on patient safety, and we communicate our commitment to safety with patients, their families, and with each other every day.
  2. Second, they want to be healed. We coach nurses to be coordinators of the patients’ care team and to partner with patients to set care goals and carry out the plan of care.
  3. Third, they want to be treated with respect and dignity, like we would treat members of our own family.

To nurses who are looking for a new opportunity to develop and advance their careers, I say consider Methodist Mansfield. The opportunity for growth is unparalleled, regardless of whether you are a new graduate or a veteran nurse with many years of experience at the bedside. We encourage nurses to pursue their professional development through advanced academic education, the Clinical Advancement Program, and participation in shared governance.

If you’re ready to join a growing organization, one with an unwavering commitment to improving and saving lives and caring for each other, then it’s time to choose Methodist Health System. Learn more by visiting Jobs.MethodistHealthSystem.org.

© Methodist Health System

EOE/M/F/D/V

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