Category: Managing Stress

Sherrie and Amanda made it to the finish line!

Sherrie

Amanda

What can you do now that you couldn’t do three months ago?

“I can complete a full strengthening workout class taught by Ginnie and walk up and down the stairs from the basement to the fourth floor and not feel like I’m going to die.”  “I am now able to run or workout and maintain my stamina without having to rest or even completely stop all together. Increased stamina and better sleep are two things that I’ve

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gained in the last three months.”

What is the most significant change that you have made
in your eating habits?

“I have added more fruits and vegetables. I eat fewer snacks, but when I do I make a conscious effort to eat something healthy and tasty. Portion size has really been a big change. Now I eat to satisfaction not to ‘stuffed.’” “Portioning out my food and incorporating more fresh vegetables and fruit has been a big change. Also learning there are no ‘bad foods’ and that it’s all in the portioning. Anything is okay in moderation.”

What part of the I Am Methodist Health program has
helped you the most?

“I believe that the group and the exercise sessions have helped a lot. However, I think my one-on-one sessions with my wellness coach have helped me most. Most sessions were about managing stress, setting boundaries, and making time to be good to myself.” “Definitely the coaching. Having one-on- one sessions with my coach has helped me to understand why I do, or don’t do, some things. Being able to go into a room where there is no judgment and feeling like I can talk, be open, and be real has immensely helped me in this program. Also my trainer, Ginnie, is always encouraging and never lets me give up, even when I beg her to.”

What advice do you give your co-workers to help them
make healthy lifestyle changes?

“Remember that you are as important as anyone else in your life and that you should treat yourself that way. You’re not alone. Decide what you want, believe that you can do it….then DO IT!” 

 

“Remember to portion control your food. There are no bad foods, just bad decisions. Stick with your meal and exercise routine no matter what and don’t let anyone — mentally, physically, or spiritually — keep you from your goals. You are worth it!”
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John and Lisa made it to the finish line!

John

 

Lisa

What can you do now that you couldn’t do three months ago?

“I can say no to foods that I don’t need to eat. In addition to this achievement, I can eat less when I do decide to eat something.” “Because of the lifestyle changes that I have been able to make and incorporate into my life, such as eating breakfast on a more regular basis, I’ve noticed a difference in my energy level. I’m usually less productive when I don’t incorporate the skills I have learned through the program.” 

What is the most significant change that you have made
in your eating habits?

“I have incorporated a much better mixture of veggies and smaller portions of meat on my plate.” “The most significant change I have made to my eating habits is cutting back on the amount of snacking. Also, I’ve replaced unhealthy snacks with more nutritional snacks such as fruit and veggies.” 

What part of the I Am Methodist Health program
has helped you the most?

“The fact that my wife is part of the program is a big reason why I’m having so much success. She’s the one who applies the concepts that  are discussed in the group and individual meetings” “The part that helped me the most is having group meetings so that we could bounce ideas off of each other.”

What advice do you give your co-workers to help them make
healthy lifestyle changes?

“Just start somewhere and make little changes like eating smaller portions or changing from regular to diet soda even once a day. Little things turn into big things!” “Pennies make dollars so start with reading nutrition labels and making small swaps such as turkey instead of beef two days a week instead of four days a week.”
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“On the first day to de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me …"

By Beth Leermakers
Wellness Coach
Methodist Health System

Not feeling so jolly this holiday season? Has a good dose of ice and cold given you cabin fever? Do you have visions of palm trees and white sandy beaches dancing in your head? There’s a lot to stress us out this time of year. Battling the weather, pressures of shopping, and balancing a hectic personal life with your professional life as a caregiver can be overwhelming.

This is also the season of excess — too many obligations and too many expectations. There’s no need to stress over excess if you remember that sometimes less is more.

What’s more, let go of stress related to things that are out of your control. After all, you can’t do much about the weather, loss of electricity, or relatives you have little in common with and rarely see. Instead seek out quiet time to relax and reflect on the bounty of good things in your life. Here are some tips to reduce stress this time of year:

  • Take charge and set limits so you can devote your time and energy to the things that matter most to you
  • Slow down and do the things that help you enjoy the season
  • Appreciate the blessings in your life such as the employees who worked throughout the night to clear roads and restore power for thousands of individuals throughout North Texas.

It’s no secret that stress can harm your health. Research shows that heart-related deaths increase by 5 percent during the holiday season. According to a study published in Circulation from the American Heart Association, fatal heart attacks peak on Christmas day, the day after Christmas, and New Year’s day. Increased stress levels can result in heightened muscle tension, headaches, upset stomachs, impaired sleep, and increased eating and alcohol consumption.

My gift to you this season is “The 12 Days of Holiday De-stress.” Please sing or hum to the tune of “The 12 Days of Christmas” as you read the lyrics below!

“On the first day of de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me:
A quiet time by the fireplace.

On the second day of de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me:
Two joyful songs, and a quiet time by the fireplace.

On the third day of de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me:
Three brisk walks in the park, two joyful songs, and a quiet time by the fireplace.

On the fourth day of de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me:
Four relaxing neck rubs, three brisk walks in the park, two joyful songs, and a quiet time by the fireplace.

On the fifth day of de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me:
Gleeful online shopping, four relaxing neck rubs, three brisk walks in the park, two joyful songs, and a quiet time by the fireplace.

On the sixth day of de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me:
Six holiday movies, gleeful online shopping, four relaxing neck rubs, three brisk walks in the park, two joyful songs, and a quiet time by the fireplace.

On the seventh day of de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me:
Seven bubble baths, six holiday movies, gleeful online shopping, four relaxing neck rubs, three brisk walks in the park, two joyful songs, and a quiet time by the fireplace.

On the eighth day of de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me:
Eight hours of sleep, seven bubble baths, six holiday movies, gleeful online shopping, four relaxing neck rubs, three brisk walks in the park, two joyful songs, and a quiet time by the fireplace.

On the ninth day of de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me:
Quality time with nine friends, eight hours of sleep, seven bubble baths, six holiday movies, gleeful online shopping, four relaxing neck rubs, three brisk walks in the park, two joyful songs, and a quiet time by the fireplace.

On the tenth day of de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me:
Ten juicy oranges, quality time with nine friends, eight hours of sleep, seven bubble baths, six holiday movies, gleeful online shopping, four relaxing neck rubs, three brisk walks in the park, two joyful songs, and a quiet time by the fireplace.

On the eleventh day of de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me:
Eleven dogs a’fetching, 10 juicy oranges, quality time with nine friends, eight hours of sleep, seven bubble baths, six holiday movies, gleeful online shopping, four relaxing neck rubs, three brisk walks in the park, two joyful songs, and a quiet time by the fireplace.

On the twelfth day of de-stress, Methodist sent tips to me:
Twelve rounds of laughing, 11 dogs a’fetching, 10 juicy oranges, quality time with nine friends, eight hours of sleep, seven bubble baths, six holiday movies, gleeful online shopping, four relaxing neck rubs, three brisk walks in the park, two joyful songs, and a quiet time by the fireplace.”

If you’re ready to hum along with an organization that helps you balance your personal and professional lives, then it’s time to consider Methodist Health System. Learn more by visiting Jobs.MethodistHealthSystem.org.

© Methodist Health System

EOE/MF/D/V

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The Survey Says: Stress Is a Big Concern for Clinicians

By Beth Leermakers
Employee Health Coach
Methodist Mansfield Medical Center and Methodist Charlton Medical Center

Want to shed some pounds? Ready to start an exercise program? These are great intentions, but what I’ve discovered is that when employees initially come to me to discuss weight loss or exercise, within five minutes the conversation invariably turns to stress. That’s why we decided to survey the clinical staff at Methodist Mansfield Medical Center about stress and the impact it is having on their lives and their jobs.

The 10-question survey asked the clinical staff to rate their responses on a scale of one (low) to 10 (high). The questions included topics such as what caused their stress, what kinds of stress were they experiencing, and what could we do to help them manage their stress. We distributed the survey in January, then compiled the results and produced a report. Respondents rated work, home, and financial as the top-three stressors in their lives. We have used the results and feedback from the survey to develop an overall stress management program to better meet their needs.

We weren’t surprised by the results. A large percentage of respondents said that their stress level was fairly high. The real value of the survey came from some of the insightful suggestions the clinicians made about how we could better support them in managing their stress. As a result, the responses helped us develop the components for a new stress management program.

We recently launched a new wellness site where employees can access stress management tools whenever and from wherever they need them. In addition, here are the survey’s top three suggestions:

  • 31.4 percent suggested creating a quiet place to relax during the day. As a result, we are working to establish individual or small group quiet time areas in the break rooms.
  • 19 percent suggested having more humor and laughter in staff meetings as appropriate. As a result, we are working with leaders on ways to make their meetings more fun.
  • 23.8 percent suggested improving the work-life balance. As a result, we are creating a series of stress management classes that I have begun to teach. The class topics focus on self-care, work-life balance, and changing the thoughts that contribute to stress.

The self-care class emphasizes the importance of clinicians’ well-being — giving themselves permission to take care of themselves so they can care for others.  This is especially important for women who are often hardwired and socialized to care for their spouse and children before they care for themselves. That means identifying what they need to focus on and then setting boundaries.

The work-life balance class encourages participants to make time to recharge.

We are programmed to respond to urgent needs. What’s more, some things take on the sense of urgency when they are not really urgent. The reality is we end up using what little time is left over for the activities that we really enjoy. Don’t we deserve to spend our high-energy time on things we enjoy? We teach participants to start out small, carving out 15 to 20 minutes a day, then gradually working to increase the amount of time they devote to themselves.

The changing-thoughts class examines how situations do not cause stress. Instead, it’s how we respond to the situation that causes stress. What if you took a short break from the work or task that is causing you stress? The work will still be there, but you’ll be in a better place mentally to handle the situation.

I’m looking forward to implementing the stress management program we’ve created at Methodist Mansfield, and more important, reducing the stress day to day.

If you’re ready to tackle your stress head on with an organization that cares about your well-being, then it’s time to choose Methodist Health System. Visit Jobs.MethodistHealthSystem.org.

© Methodist Health System

EOE/MF/D/V

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Sarah Reynolds is Methodist Health: Making progress.

By Sarah Reynolds, CMOM

Sarah is an office manager at MedHealth. Her goal is to get physically fit so she can keep up with her children. After turning to snacking for stress relief in the past, she’s ready to adjust her grocery list to include healthier choices, and she’s making working out part of her routine!

1. Congratulations on reaching month three of I am Methodist Health. What has been your biggest hurdle to overcome?  

Stress snacking. I fell off the track a couple of times in February due to a lot of stress, but never really beat myself up about it. I talked with Beth Leermakers, my health coach, and acknowledged that I was stressed. She helped me look for other ways to channel the stress rather than through food. 

I also was challenged because I wasn't going to the gym as often as I wanted because of its location and family obligations. Instead, I joined a gym here in town so I could more easily increase my physical activity. No more excuses. It's made a difference! I am working out more frequently and longer.

2.  What Methodist resources are you using to help you make these changes?

My health coach and I talk often, and she has been so supportive. She really has coached me through this process every step of the way. She helped me focus on accepting that stress happens and then finding better ways to deal with it.

3.  What progress have you made this month?

I have made great progress this month! I’ve lost more pounds. I’m eating better and exercising. I feel like I'm living right! I have more energy and I feel better about myself. Best of all, I’m working to give my family the foundation for healthy habits that will hopefully last the rest of their lives!

4.  What advice do you give your co-workers to help motivate them to make healthy lifestyle changes?           

I encourage my co-workers and staff constantly. Whenever a lunch is brought into our office, I'll put the calories up on our break room whiteboard showing what each portion contains, not to mention the calories for the desserts! It's opened a lot of eyes around here.

In February, my biggest sense of accomplishment came from the accumulation of putting all of these healthy habits together and seeing results. I have dropped some major pounds this month, and I went shopping this weekend for SMALLER clothes! I love working out and going to the gym. I actually RAN instead of walked around our block this weekend! I feel like everything I eat or prepare for my family is an accomplishment because it's better for us.

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Kathy Clinton is Methodist Health: Gaining momentum.

By Kathy Clinton

Kathy is a massage therapist in Physical Medicine at Methodist Richardson Medical Center. Kathy’s goal is to run a 5K with her son. Get your running shoes on, and go Kathy!

  1. You’re in your second month of I am Methodist Health. Congratulations! In general, how’s it going?

The first couple of weeks were tough for me to get into a routine and figure out my goals. I met with Ginnie, my trainer, who told me that she was no Jillian Michaels, but made me sprint on the elliptical machine. The support I’m receiving from Karen, my health coach, as well as my co-workers is wonderful. I feel things are finally falling into place. 

2.   What change or changes have you been able to make?

I am eating. In fact, I eat almost 1,700 calories a day and I’m losing weight! Prior to this program, I believed in the starvation diet. In my mind, if I didn’t eat, I wouldn’t gain weight and might lose some. So the fact that I’m eating and losing is great! It doesn’t hurt that I spend my mornings in the gym and my evenings at the track. Do I like the changes? Heck, yes. 
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3.   Do you have any progress updates you’d like to share with your fans?

I am on my way to my first 5K run in March, just a few weeks away. I am excited and terrified at the same time. My son is becoming my biggest cheerleader and encouraging me every day.  

 4.   What’s been the biggest lesson you’ve learned the first month? 

Going into week four was my hardest week. You would have thought I was over the hump by then, but stress from home, school (I’m working on my BS), finances, and life got in the way. It was the stuff that meditation and lavender could not take care of. I started getting down on myself and it was hard to make it to the gym. But I did not binge eat! Buying healthy left me few options when I wanted to snack, so after a large green salad I was good to go.

In January, I felt like I was really starting to make progress when I could climb three flights of stairs without a problem! 

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Reducing Holiday Stress

By Sherry George, LCSW
Social Work Manager
Methodist Richardson Medical Center

Aah, the holidays … full of laughter, full of spirit, full of stress. How can you make it through the holidays without getting stressed out? That’s an age-old question that has been asked by countless generations. Between shopping, party planning, cooking, the dynamics of family get-togethers, financial pressures, and more, it’s no wonder that many people are counting the days until the holidays are over and the new year begins.

As a health care worker, caring for patients during the holidays, especially critically ill patients, can be more stressful than normal. The fact is the holidays are charged with emotions. Couple that with sick patients and family expectations on top of personal obligations and responsibilities, and there may be the potential for a meltdown.

Technology is also an added stressor. A constant need to check our phones for text messages and emails is not only stressful, it also tends to distract us from focusing on what’s really important — family and friends. Holidays are about relationships, and the best way to build and maintain good relationships is through face-to-face time where true communication takes place.

Stress isn’t pretty. It can take a physical and emotional toll on all of us. Stress can make us feel tense, cause us to lose sleep, give us headaches, make us feel tired and anxious, cause us to be irritable, and sometimes, even depressed.

So, what should we do? The key to staying as stress-free as possible is balancing work life and personal life. Here are 10 tips to help you de-stress during the holidays:

  1. Have an attitude of gratitude. Misery and gratitude cannot occupy the same space in our psychological house. We have the power to choose between these emotional states. Are you seeing the glass half full or half empty?
  2. Keep your expectations balanced. Everything doesn’t have to be perfect. Some things will go wrong. You won’t get everything you want. Remember, worrying about things that are out of your control is useless and stressful.
  3. Don’t try to do too much. Taking on too many tasks and obligations can dampen your spirits to the point of exhaustion. No wonder people get cranky, irritable, and depressed. Learn to say no. Delegate as much as possible and manage your time wisely.
  4. Don’t isolate yourself. Don’t sit at home feeling left out. Get out of the house and find some way to join in. There are hundreds of places you can go to hear music, enjoy the holiday sights, or volunteer to help others.
  5. Don’t overspend. Create a reasonable budget and stick to it. Don’t try to buy happiness with an avalanche of gifts. There are an abundance of unstructured, low-cost, fun holiday activities available for you and your family. Try window shopping, a trip to the country for lunch, an excursion to look at holiday lights, and more.
  6. Get some sunlight. Many people suffer depression due to a lack of sunlight because of shorter days or gloomy weather. Twenty minutes of sun a day can lessen the seasonal blues.
  7. Don’t overindulge. Be aware of how certain foods affect your mood. Loading up on fats and sweets is likely to cause you to have less energy, make you feel guilty, and feel more stressed. Be sure to get plenty of sleep and physical activity.
  8. Plan ahead. Many people purposely avoid the mall to avoid the stress associated with a crowd of shoppers. Instead, shopping online and preplanning for parties and other holiday events can prevent last-minute scrambling.
  9. Learn acceptance. Try to accept family members and friends as they are, even if they don’t live up to all of your expectations. Be understanding if others get upset if things go wrong. As families change and grow, traditions and rituals change as well. Choose a few cherished traditions to carry through the years and be open to creating new ones.
  10. Give yourself a break. Create time for yourself devoted to doing things you love to do. If you can’t take care of yourself, it’s harder to care for others. Just 15 minutes alone without distractions may be the refresher you need to handle everything you need to do. Take a walk at night to gaze at the stars. Listen to soothing sounds of the season. Find something to reduce your stress and clear your mind.

At Methodist Health System, taking care of each other is just as important as taking care of our patients. If you care about your career and are ready to practice in a mutually supportive environment, then it’s time to choose Methodist. Learn more by visiting Jobs.MethodistHealthSystem.org.

© Methodist Health System

EOE/M/F/D/V

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Bring on Fall. Bring on the New You.

By Beth Leermakers
Employee Health Coach
Methodist Mansfield Medical Center and Methodist Charlton Medical Center

We all remember the story of the little engine that could from our childhood. The tiny engine repeated the mantra, “I think I can. I think I can.” to climb up a steep mountain. Many of us are in the same situation as that little engine when it comes to maintaining and improving our health and well-being.

When it comes to our health, there really aren’t any mysteries. We know what we need to do — eat right, get eight hours of sleep, exercise regularly, and reduce stress. Knowing what to do is one thing, but doing it — that’s the tricky part. And with the kids back in school and fall right around the corner, now’s the perfect time to make some changes.

So, how do you move from “I can’t” to “I could”? Small steps and victories are important. First, you have to want to start

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the journey. Not only do you have to want the health benefits resulting from change, you have to be willing to do the work. A cost/benefit analysis might help you weigh the pros and cons.

  • What are the day-to-day benefits? Be specific and write them down. In terms of wellness and quality of life, examples might include:
    • I want to be able to sit on the floor and play with my grandchildren.
    • I want to be able to tie my shoes.
    • I want to carry in my groceries or walk upstairs without getting winded.
    • I want to go on a bike ride with my friends.
  • What are the barriers that are keeping you from making the needed changes? You must be honest with yourself. Perhaps you’re thinking, “I don’t have time.” If that’s the case, not having time really means it’s not a priority to you. Motivated people find a way to make changes to reach their goals.
  • Do the benefits outweigh the barriers? Can you remove the barriers? As long as you perceive that the changes are more costly to make than the benefits you will receive, you won’t change. It’s that simple.

OK, so how do I move from “I could” to “I can”? In psychology, we use the term shaping. Shaping refers to making small steps, getting small wins, and building on them toward the desired goal. Weight loss provides a perfect example. Losing weight is about 80 percent food and 20 percent exercise. One pound equals 3,500 calories. So, to lose a pound a week, you need to eliminate 500 calories per day. Broken into small steps, here are a few ways to reach that goal.

  • A can of soda contains about 240 calories. Cutting out two cans of soda per day for a week equals one less pound.
  • Rather than enjoying a fried chicken sandwich with supersized fries and a small soda, save about 580 calories by eating a grilled chicken sandwich, small fries, and a diet soda. Following this routine daily will cut one pound per week.

Finally, how do I move from “I can” to “I did”! In terms of diet, view a temporary slip as a one-day occurrence. Get back on track right away, that day if possible, and realize you haven’t done that much damage. The key to success is consistency. When you reach your goal, celebrate with tangible rewards and reinforce your new behavior. “I did it! Congratulations to me!” Then enjoy your healthy reward to yourself.

If you’re ready to make positive, healthy changes in your life, then it’s time to choose Methodist Health System. Learn more by visiting Jobs.MethodistHealthSystem.org.

© Methodist Health System

EOE/MF/D/V

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Taking the Stress Out of Managing Stress

By Beth Leermakers
Employee Health Coach
Methodist Mansfield Medical Center and Methodist Charlton Medical Center

How stressed are you? If you say you’re really stressed, you’re not alone. Suffice it to say, we are living and coping with stress almost 24 hours a day.

Why so much stress? We are overextended, committed to too many things, and not willing to say “no.” Women seem to be more overextended than men. Consider the average day for a working mom. From grocery shopping and meal preparation to school and day-care logistics to work responsibilities and taking care of aging parents — and don’t forget party coordination, volunteer efforts, and carpooling — is it any wonder that working moms feel stressed?

Are we really more stressed than our grandparents or parents? Probably not, but with instant communication, we are much more aware of our stressors. We often feel obligated to respond at all times of the day and night. Who wants to be “on” all the time?

Every day, I help employees at Methodist Mansfield Medical Center and Methodist Charlton Medical Center deal with their stress. Many people think that health care workers suffer more stress than others. That may be true if they are dealing with a life and death situation. But sometimes, we create our own stress by catastrophizing situations or focusing on the worst thing that could happen when, statistically, that disaster is very unlikely to happen.

What is important to remember is to keep stress in perspective. One way you can do that is to rate your stress on a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being the least stressful. Ask yourself, “what is the worst thing that could happen? How likely is it, really? Will this situation bother me tomorrow? A week from now? Now, where is my stress on this scale?”

Methodist Health System has put employee well-being at the top of its list of priorities. Providing personal health coaches demonstrates that we understand how devastating stress can be to our employees’ health and how it can affect their abilities to do their very best. Left unaddressed, stress can reduce the immune system, exhibit itself in physical symptoms, and most important, make the individual’s life miserable. Individuals suffering from high stress are often sleep deprived and may have increased or reduced appetites. This can set up a vicious cycle that increases stress levels.

My goal is to help you adopt a proactive approach to take care of yourself. Helping you get off the stress treadmill so you can make life-enhancing changes is critically important to breaking the stress cycle.

Bottom line, how do you do it? The key is to start by making small changes such as taking a five-minute break twice a week.

Here are some de-stressing tips:

The benefits of managing stress can

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be plentiful:

  • Reduced visits to doctors. Approximately 75 percent of referrals to doctors’ offices are believed to be related to stress.**
  • You’ll improve your overall health and well-being.
  • You may have more energy and feel better overall.
  • You may sleep better.

If you’re ready to team up with an organization who cares about your well-being, then it’s time to choose Methodist Health System. Visit Jobs.MethodistHealthSystem.org.

 

© Methodist Health System

EOE/MF/D/V

*Source: American Institute of Stress
**Source: WELCOA

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